The Ultimate List of Blog Post Ideas

You know you should be blogging. And I know you know it.

But, why? I hear you ask. I’m so busy with everything else. I totally get you.

Ok, so first the why. Blogging can establish you as an authority in your industry, help you to build an audience of potential customers or clients, and it’s also great for SEO. Depending on your industry, your blog can also act as a portfolio. For instance, potential clients can quickly get a sense of my writing style by reading my blog.

But who has the energy to come up with content ideas all the time? Even fortnightly blogging comes around very quickly, I can tell you!

So let me help.

This list of 11 ideas is readily adaptable to your industry, and flexible enough to suit your unique tone - whether that’s more serious or light and humorous. Each blog post idea also offers a WHY - the benefit for your readers. Ultimately, it’s them you are writing for and their time is precious.

When it comes to crafting the post, make sure you always create a strong headline to engage your readers, using a ‘hook’ that relates to your topic. Try not to be too clever or obscure! Numbers can work well to grab the attention of readers, such as 10 Instagram Accounts You Need to be Following. Bam!

I really hope you enjoy using this list of ideas, and I’m sure it will spur you on to create many more of your own.

 

A day in the life of...your profession.

Help your readers - potential clients and customers - learn more about you and what your typical day looks like.

Bust myths about your profession.

Assist your readers to understand more about what you do work-wise, and perhaps helps them overcome any blocks they might have about using your product or services.

Quick tips about small business.

Establish yourself as someone your readers trust and appreciate. Tips could be anything from how to make over a LinkedIn profile, to how to stay organised for tax time. Just think - what could simplify life for a small business owner just like you?

How to survive the first year in business.

This piece could be either humorous or serious, while providing practical advice for readers.

Instagram accounts or bloggers to follow.

Provide your readers with new inspiration, resources and networks.

Podcasts to listen to.

Position yourself as someone who shares useful resources. Don’t worry if you don’t feel like an authority or an expert! You have something worth sharing.

Music that motivates or inspires you.

Reveal more about yourself, while broadening the interests of your readers. After all, who doesn’t want to feel more motivated or inspired?

Networking tips or tricks.

Give your readers valuable advice about an aspect of business that scares the pants off some people.

A product or service review.

Review a business resource, cafe, restaurant, playground - you name it. Help readers to learn more about what interests you, while perhaps introducing them to a new product or service.

What I wish I knew when I was starting out.

Position yourself as someone who shares resources and good advice freely with others.

Teach your readers something.

The ‘something’ doesn’t need to strictly relate to your business, but make sure it’s helpful information.

Happy blogging!

P.S. If blogging still sounds too scary - or time consuming - just shout! I'll happily craft any blog posts you need.

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5 Grammar Rules You Should be Breaking

If you get my lil’ monthly newsletter fresh to your inbox, you’ve already had a sneaky peek at today’s post. But, I thought these tips were worth sharing with all of you, so here’s a bigger, better and brighter version to help you break grammar rules with confidence.

Just because your high school English teacher told you so, doesn’t mean all grammatical conventions need to be followed to the letter. I should know - I was that teacher! After all, there needs to be some creative license, especially when you’re writing about your business. What’s more - rules change and evolve over time (which is why we don’t all sound like we’ve just stepped out of a Shakespeare play). It’s time to fast-forward from 1600 to 2017 and get your grammar rebel on.

Sentences can start with conjunctions.

I’ve already done it in this post (did you notice?) These days, grammar rules are much more fluid, and using and or because can be a really punchy way to begin a sentence. Don't overdo it, but it totally works sometimes.

Passive voice is sometimes best.

The spellcheck function on the computer loves to tell you when your sentences are written in passive, rather than active form. The problem with that is, it's not a one-size-fits-all approach. Occasionally passive voice just sounds better and flows more naturally. If so, use it. (Just a quick side note on spellcheck - it’s not a human. Always read your work aloud to find errors. It also seriously helps you edit and streamline tone-of-voice. Try it!)

Relax - contract.

Unless you're writing very formally, incorporate contractions (they work especially well for online writing). When marketing to a particular audience, your voice should sound conversational to build a relationship with your reader.

One-sentence paragraphs can be wonders.

Online content should be easy for readers to skim. People are searching for quick answers, and don’t want - or have the time - to read your content word-for-word. Reading chunks of text-heavy content is a push for anyone. One sentence paragraphs can visually break up the page or help to drive an important point home.

Slang is a-ok.

Keep your audience is mind - if it fits, use it. Just make sure you're confident with the vernacular so it sounds natural, rather than forced.

Ultimately, talking and writing about your business should be fun. It’s yours! Enjoy sharing it with the world. But if you lack the confidence, clarity or - the biggie - time, then I can certainly help you out.

If you’d like a rule-breaking partner-in-crime, hit me up!

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What I’ve learnt in my first year in business

That first year in business. Would we still do it if we knew how hard it would actually be? The fact that you’re really ‘on’ 24/7, making very little money and frantically upskilling well outside your comfort zone? I would. Because, as tough as the first year has been in many ways, I’m happier than I’ve been in a long time.

Here are 11 important things I have learnt over this past year working as a freelance copywriter.

1. Mindset matters

Your mindset and attitude go a long way to ensuring you can go the distance! Things like goal setting, staying focused and thinking positively really do make a difference. I nourished myself with exercise and yoga, fuelled my passion for learning by listening to podcasts and reading, and networked with like-minded people. Importantly too, I spent time with my family and friends who centred me.

2. A network works

Having a powerful network around you is essential, including family, friends and professionals. Nurture these relationships. Push yourself beyond your comfort zone when it comes to professional networking (even if, like me, the idea terrifies you). I hunted around to find a business networking group that felt like the ‘right fit’, sought out like-minded types on social media and learnt to talk about myself and my skillset.

3. You have value

It is important to charge what you’re worth, perhaps not in the earliest of days, but once you become more established. Some small business owners are dead-against offering mates’ rates or freebies, but I’m open to it in the right context. It can be a good way to build up your client base and gather testimonials. Just make sure you have the time for it or you’ll find yourself resenting it. You might not always make the ‘right’ decision around this - I certainly didn’t - but it’s all part of the learning process. Always ask for testimonials too. They are gold! Let your happy clients do the spruiking for you!

4. Don’t wait

Stop waiting around for the perfect moment to start - it’s not coming. The time is now.

5. Trust your gut

Don’t waste valuable time over-thinking everything. Of course you’ll be winging it at times, especially in those early days. Be kind to yourself and trust that you’ll make the best decision you can in the moment. Just a note to trust your gut (especially when it comes to more difficult clients). Nine times out of ten, you're probably right.

6. Understand your client

In the beginning, it can be tempting to want everyone as your client. Unfortunately, this broad approach may mean you end up pleasing no-one. Try to understand your ideal client or customer by getting into their head (find ‘types’ of your client on social media and stalk away!) and figuring out how you can solve their problem.  

7. Social strategy

Social media marketing is important (engagement over ‘likes’), but it is just one piece of the pie. Spend time focusing on your website, network, write great content (and have the SEO gods smile upon you) and email any potential clients to reach out. I’m personally not on every social platform and I don’t always work with a particular ‘strategy’ in mind when I post. But I’m always 100% me.

8. Good things take time

There will be days where you feel like you’re winning and other days you almost throw the towel in. Take time to acknowledge the wins, however small.

9. Say no to 24/7

It can be so tempting to work all the time, but make sure you carve out time to rest, have a break and fill your cup. You’ll become a better business owner for it. Promise.

10. Systems and processes

Putting systems and processes in place will save you time in the long run. I certainly didn’t factor in that I’d be learning accounting software, or how to create graphics, or a newsletter template. If it’s just you, you kinda need to take it on. Occasionally I will outsource, if the task is way beyond the scope of what I can do, and that’s been great too.

11. You will change

This small business journey will alter you. There will be so many new people in your world, and you yourself will grow. Embrace the changes and all of those people who choose to walk beside you.

As I prepare for my second year of freelance life, I can't wait to see what learnings lie ahead.

Want to be a part of this journey? I'd love to work some word magic with you. Say hello!

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Andrea Drake - Fitness & Wellness Superstar

Andrea Drake is a real dynamo. Not only is she an accomplished Physical Education secondary teacher who leads a department, she is the inspiration behind Melbourne Fitness Diaries (MFD). Ange runs this group to empower women to take control of their fitness, strength and wellbeing. She operates with passion and infectious enthusiasm, and genuine joie de vivre. I should know - she's my trainer and, my oh my, she's good! 

I admire Ange as a businesswoman and wanted to know more about what makes her tick and how words factor in to her work. I know you will enjoy getting to know Ange and MFD.

How important are the right words?

The right words are incredibly important when trying to engage, motivate and support members of my community to be the best versions of themselves.

Nutrition science can also be so complicated. My role is to make this information accessible, simple to understand and easy to follow for my clients. There is so much content on the internet, particularly in social media feeds, that promotes fitness and nutrition advice. Unfortunately not all of this content is credible, which can create confusion for the girls I work with.

When counselling clients through sticky points in their lives or writing health and lifestyle articles, I can’t go on faith alone. My words reflect proven systems and science because my clients’ success and happiness depends on me doing my job properly.

What gets you up in the morning?

Passion. I feel so blessed to have found a career that enables me to have such a positive impact on other people's lives. From a personal perspective, I see the start of each day as an opportunity to be challenged, to grow, learn and become the best version of myself.

What led you to your current career choice?

I have always been active. Growing up in country Victoria, I played a lot of sport and spent a lot of time outside. I have always had a passion for human movement, which led me to complete my Bachelor of Education, specialising in Physical Education.

After a few years in teaching, I realised that many of my friends and family were looking to me for fitness or health advice. Getting my certification in Fitness was the best decision I could have made. As soon as I began working in the fitness industry, I fell in love with exercise programming, creating and sharing nutritional plans, and working specifically with women.

What are the most effective ways you market your business?

Word of mouth and client referrals continue to be the best way to market myself. I am incredibly fortunate that my community of girls are so supportive of Melbourne Fitness Diaries and of me.

Facebook has revolutionised the marketing world. I use Facebook advertising to find girls outside my training community who have similar interests. I have been really successful in using this method to recruit girls into my 28-Day Intro Challenge.

How has the landscape of your industry changed since you began?

Technology, social media and the plethora of apps available has transformed the fitness industry over the last 5 years. You don't have to look very far to find a cheap online gym program that will be sent to your inbox faster than it takes to put your gym clothes on. While this could be seen to be putting fitness professionals out of business, nothing could be further from the truth.

People will always value the ability to connect with a professional and a community, with research suggesting this supports individuals reaching their health and fitness goals. Apps, such as MyFitnessPal, Fitbit and RunKeeper, help to increase client accountability to set behavioural goals.

I use technology every day to help me stay connected with my community, via Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and blogging (Wordpress). I also use the online training system Trainerize for online clients and Hootsuite to help me schedule posts.

What is the best piece of advice you could give to other freelancers/small business owners?

Be patient. It takes time to develop systems and learn new things. It can become overwhelming when you look at individuals who have 'made it', have a great website, loads of followers and testimonials. It takes time to build a great brand. You are running your own race, so take your time, know what you are about and trust your gut instinct.

Why should people working in any industry prioritise their health and fitness? How does it help you to work smarter?

For a long time, I thought exercise was about helping you to 'look better'. As I have grown in the industry, my training style has changed based on what works for me and letting go of ego. You don't need to be a maniac and train every day to get results.

Training and eating well gives me clarity and a sense of calm. When my body feels good, so does my mind. In a world where we are all so busy, taking time out for yourself is the best form of self care you can commit to.

To learn more about MFD and Ange's approach to training, visit Melbourne Fitness Diaries.

To give yourself more time for fitness and wellness, consider outsourcing your copywriting!

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Book Review - Confessions of a Misfit Entrepreneur by Kate Toon

I first came along Kate Toon back in 2016 when I was still summoning up the courage to call myself a copywriter, despite already taking on clients. I was doing a lot of research to try and educate myself about the industry and current trends, when I discovered the gold nugget that is the ‘Hot Copy’ podcast. This podcast about all things copywriting is hosted by Kate and her partner-in-crime Belinda Weaver. I related instantly to these two because they are natural, no-frills presenters who speak honestly about the peaks and troughs of copywriting and freelance life.

Gradually over the months that followed, I continued to listen. I began to understand and relate to much of the content, and to take on board advice offered by the pair. I also started to tell people who asked what I did, I’m a copywriter. Eeep, scary! But, of course, nobody argued with me. Instead they wanted to know more about my work.

Flash forward to the middle of this year, with my business Instagram and website up and running, and my portfolio of work building. I even took the bold step of purchasing accounting software. No matter what I did though, I just didn’t quite feel like a small business owner, whatever that was supposed to feel or be like.

Enter Kate Toon again with her book Confessions of a Misfit Entrepreneur.

Kate has written a book about small business and freelance life that is unlike any other business book I’ve ever clapped my eyes on. She is brutally honest about what the process was like for her and how many ‘rules’ she broke along the way. Kate’s book is divided into chapters, each of which tackles a popular entrepreneurial myth. She responds to each in turn, blasting some out of the water and compromising where others are concerned. I found it so refreshing to hear about someone’s unconventional journey.

Kate’s style is wry and humorous at times, and she tells it likes she means it. Whilst I don’t relate to all aspects of her story - (Um, I don’t have three burgeoning business just yet! I also can’t work in my pyjamas because it just doesn't feel right) - I found it a real page-turner. Kate’s tone is natural, relatable, and definitely no-nonsense. One of the best pieces of advice she offers is to stop comparing yourself to other people and she has a great point. Since finishing the book, I’ve curbed my Insta-stalking, focusing on being me and doing my own thing, without worrying so much about what others think.

I would recommend this book to freelancers or small business owners, or even those with an inkling they might like to venture down this path. I finished the book feeling more positive and knowing there’s more than one way of achieving small business success.

To learn more about me and how I do business in my own way, click here.

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